training

Questions and tips for safe and fun flight.

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training

Postby scrapper » Sat Mar 19, 2011 7:01 pm

might anyone comment = for the beginner who wants to be a very good pilot and a safe one -
what is more important quality of instructor? or hours/experience logged?

Is the 1st auto rotation scary?

Any general suggestions for the beginning copter pilot?

Thx scarp cof
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Re: training

Postby Ron Spiker » Sun Mar 20, 2011 10:12 am

Quality of instructor/instruction will have more impact than the number of hours he has, IMHO.
The first auto doesn't need to be scarry. Depends on how its taught.
Try to get some recommendations from other students that the instructor has taught to see how they liked him/her. Hopefully the instructor will have enough hours in the model you are being trained in to know it well, not just the 5 hours transition required by the FARs.
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Re: training

Postby 9121u » Wed Mar 23, 2011 4:17 pm

scrapper i think you should get your ride or training from ron, i am sure there other very good pilots and instructors out there to..but i noticed your in pa.and he is to.the closer the better,i highly recommended ron,because i have watched him since he bought a brantly he is very careful and with no flying issues and he has a lot of hours in brantlys and other helicopters i love his pre flights he all most does a annual for pre flight and that to me is a very good safe pilot, i was the one that told him he should be an instructor and Guss what he has a CFI and is very successful at it and i have flown with him i am scared of heights RON made it easy for me so that's says it all .... tom
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Re: training

Postby scrapper » Sun May 08, 2011 7:13 pm

Those not familiar with ‘coptering immediately think- what happens when you lose your engine,, errrnnnnnnnnnoooohnooo - crash. Explaining the auto-rotate helps a lot. My first taste of an auto was exhilarating, mostly! From a novice, my fear is getting the timing down with 20 feet to go, seems you have to be pretty precise.
COF
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Re: training

Postby 9121u » Sun May 08, 2011 8:27 pm

OWEN ... its like any thing else you ll have to practice it i'm sure wants you start training and do autos you ll think back and say that wasn't that bad.they don't have to be precise just very close so you don't bang her up.......tom
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Re: training

Postby Ron Spiker » Mon May 09, 2011 3:58 am

scrapper wrote:Those not familiar with ‘coptering immediately think- what happens when you lose your engine,, errrnnnnnnnnnoooohnooo - crash. Explaining the auto-rotate helps a lot. My first taste of an auto was exhilarating, mostly! From a novice, my fear is getting the timing down with 20 feet to go, seems you have to be pretty precise.
COF


You won't (or shouldn't) get into actual auto training until you know how to handle the helicopter. Then the instructor should start out slowly with introducing the autos and doing several high recoveries and working your way down closer to the ground before doing the flare and recovery until it is where it needs to be. If taught properly and at the right time in your overall training, it shouldn't be a terrifying experience. Seeing the ground rush up at you at 1800 FPM when you're down below 300'-200'-100' can certainly be a scary time. But if your instructor trains you properly it doesn't need to be. The Brantly has very nice auto characteristics... nice and smooth. The instructor will work with you to get the timing down for that flare. You'll get the sight picture for what to look for. That's all part of the training.
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Re: training

Postby tom dunno » Sat Dec 24, 2011 6:30 pm

I am always excited to here from helicopter enthusiasts. You guys are what keeps helicopters in the air. It takes dedication and the will to understand more to keep flying safe. Autorotations are unique to rotorcraft and do become second nature. In my Army training (Hugh 269's) we used to fly with fellow trainees and chopped the throttle on each other six or seven times a day; It was routine for us back then. Their is risk involved if you do not practice them. We completed them to the ground every time. Most civil training involves recovery at a hover; less risk and wear on the machine (skid plates). Insurance company's dictate most of this nowadays. If it is your machine and you okay it, I train to the ground. You must find that level touchdown point or you may see upsets. Level ground or paved surfaces are a necessity for practice.

I have flown helicopters since 1968 (US Army, Viet Nam 1970) and have always loved the uniqueness of rotor flying. They are a wonderful machine and only those who have flown them Know that. I am a airport manager and fly more fixed wing than helicopters (cheaper for the customer to fly) but I know what you know when you take to rotors; I also instruct in gyroplanes. I have not yet been to the PA fly-in but will soon. If you are ever in NW Ohio, please stop in, we can talk. I have 1,600 hours in Helicopters and more than 100 hours in six types and I know that the Brantly is the best kept secret in Helicopters. Happy Flying Tom Dunno, NW Ohio Helicopters LLC
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Re: training

Postby Ron Spiker » Sat Dec 24, 2011 7:27 pm

Hi Tom, welcome to the forum. Always great to have new people join and participate in the forum.

Ron
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